Wednesday, October 08, 2008

Voting as an Evangelical

Ok, so the irony is I learned about his book 4 hours after I voted, but I'm still going to buy it. Maybe I'll get some guidance for the message on Nov. 2nd, 'Do Christianity and Politics Mix?' If anyone's already read it, let me know what you thought.

The folks at Koinonia asked Dr. Olson for some prevoting food for thought. Here's what he offered:

5 Questions to consider before voting Republican:

1) What will happen to the poor in a Republican administration?

2) Will a Republican administration pursue world peace?

3) How will a Republican administration promote mercy, compassion and justice for all?

4) Is a Republican administration likely to be unduly influenced by large corporations?

5) Can a Republican administration show respect for every human person's dignity and rights?

5 Questions to consider before voting Democratic:

1) What will happen to the not-yet-born in a Democratic administration?

2) Will a Democratic administration keep America and others safe from terrorism?

3) How will a Democratic administration promote security and safety for Americans and others?

4) Is a Democratic administration likely to be unduly influenced by liberal special interest groups?

5) Can a Democratic administration show respect for traditional family values?

1 comment:

SEG said...

Wow, interesting.

I might even nuance those questions a bit more (AND apply them to both Dem's and Rep's)---

So, for example, question 2 for the Republicans is:
Will a Republican administration pursue world peace?

But, as we heard from McCain last night, America is apparently the light of the world: "America is the greatest force for good in the history of the world."

Really?

So it's not just "Will a Republican administration pursue world peace?" ... It's "How?"

Seems to me McCain sees even "non-peaceful" actions as sound with the America-is-Jesus doctrine. Is that ok?

To take another example from the Democratic questions:
"What will happen to the not-yet-born in a Democratic administration?"

I'd ask further questions, again ... not just to say "pro-life" (which is an unhelpful term anyway), but to say how will a Dem/Rep candidate address the abortion issue? Will they address the roots (i.e. poverty, support for child care, making having a baby affordable for low income women, health care, community development) rather than the branches (i.e. dealing with doctors/clinics)?

Anyway, those are just two examples. The questions are certainly a good start, but not enough :) Maybe that's why there's a whole book on it!!

Thanks, Dan.